Big Tech Attacks the Black Media

A long running campaign of anti-Black censorship continues.


Those tuning into the Black media in the last month have with doubt noticed streaming playback difficulties, missing donations, missing chats or comments, and explicit restrictions of independent Black media content in the sharing algorithms.

After a long summer of lawsuits waged by Black content creators against anti-black companies like Google/ YouTube or Yahoo, one would think that large tech firms would’ve learned to avoid directly confronting the Black grassroots.


However the firms have renewed their attacks on Black independent content creators.
Many Black content creators have reported missing donations to their channels in the past weeks, continuing a trend of large media platforms like YouTube demonetizing Black channels.


However, this isn’t the first time Youtube has targeted Black citizens.


In 2019 the tech giant was sued for intentional and systematic racial discrimination against Black content creators.

The lawsuit only confirmed what we all knew.


YouTube arbitrarily, capriciously, and deceptively restricts access to Black media content while promoting unfettered access to racist trash like ‘pewdiepie’ or Joe Rogan.
YouTube often engages in discriminatory, anticompetitive and unlawful suppression practices in order to hinder Black content creators.


YouTube also excluded Black content creators from “full revenue generation” merely because the metadata indicates that the video contains references to terms such as “BLM,” “Black,” “White,” “Racism,” “Racial Profiling,” “Police Shootings,” “Police Brutality,” “Black Lives Matter,” the names of individuals killed by law enforcement, and other terms or euphemisms “known and particular” to the Black community.


They often designate videos that discuss serious issues or current events important to the Black community as “not family friendly” and excluded them from YouTube’s search function, rendering them essentially “invisible” to those using the platform.
YouTube will also allow any user, including “racists, sexists, white supremacists, Neo-Nazis, and other hate speech trolls,” to “report” or “flag” videos believed to violate YouTube’s Terms of Service without verifying the supposed violation.


While a separate lawsuit alleged that Google often excluded videos posted by Black content creator from the website’s “Up Next” and “Trending” recommendations on users’ screens

Google even went as far as to freeze the number of subscribers, number of viewers, and view time metrics used by the defendants to determine monetization and other perks—on the “Analytics” pages of Black independent media channel while Google actively promoted and monetized videos including hate speech against the Black community even after dozens of viewers flagged the racist content down.


Google shuttles viewers away from Black websites and media content, then throttled them to white supremacist content creators.

Lastly Twitter, a social media platform that has benefitted the most from Black content creators, has now went on a spree of locking or deleting independent Black content creators’ accounts.

Twitter often engages in targeted campaigns known as mass deletions, where within seconds the company removes thousands of accounts that Twitter alleges to be ‘fake’, however this policy bore much public scrutiny due to the platforms cleansing of thousands of Hong Kong protestors accounts during the height of the Umbrella protest.


A Call to Action


The political discourse in the Black community has been uplifted thanks to the voices of the Black media.
However, we all know that speaking truth to power creates enemies in high places; Firms like Google and Facebook often take aim at Black content creators, and that means the grassroots will need to be prepared for a series of legal battles in order to shield their advocates from potential adverse action.
If the grassroots want to help, we’ll need to start

  1. Sharing every Black content creators video to one different platform
    This is the easy step, make sure to post our content creators on 1 other platform once a day.
  2. Boost Black media creators to 500,000 subscribers a piece.
    This will take some muscle and discipline on the behalf of the grassroots. Mainstream Black issues are usually isolated to ghetto gossip or music updates. This means that politics should be unpopular, right?
    Wrong.
    Its unpopular because we haven’t made it popular enough yet. Black soci-economic political content isn’t popular because we haven’t flooded the airspace yet.
    Black Americans are the nation and the world’s trendsetters. This was never more apparent than during the Holy Uprising of 2020, when the online world turned Black content creator’s council into physical action in the real world in response to anti-Black racism,
    Essentially, the people don’t have it because we haven’t given it to them.
    Its time for us to kick it up a notch, and begin to center all of our content around Black based media.

    Additionally, other sites aide content creators in recruiting subscribers for their channel. Black viewers must consider using these sites to bolster our numbers in a quicker fashion.
    Keep in mind that our competition has cheated in this regard, even going to “farms” who provide robotic viewers for them. This gives them inflated numbers compared to the Black media. We need to find the sites.
  3. Be prepared for more crowd funding initiatives.
    2021 will be the year of crowd funding initiatives. Its no surprise to anyone that the Black community lacks its own corporate infrastructure in order to provide its media content creators substantial financial incentive to continue attacking white supremacy.
    So that means we’ll need to be prepared to quickly pull our monies together in order to facilitate the kind of action we saw when we raised a quarter of a million dollars to get Kenneth Walker proper legal council.
    There’s no way that we can brag about spending millions going to a Tiffany Haddish or Kevin Hart movie while our Black empowerment stalwarts can’t get a few hundred thousand of our dollars in a 6 month crowdfunding effort.
    Simply put, we have to power up.
    Kyle Rittenhouse raised some 1.5 million dollars for shooting protestors at a Black Lives Matter rally. This for a man who is undoubtedly guilty of murder.
    Will 2021 be the year where a Black man in dire need of aide gets a million dollars in donations from the Family. This is by far our top priority.
  4. Make sure to mention the war being waged against us
    Black twitter is the most popular portion of the online social media platform, meaning that our issues of the day become everyone’s issues of the day. Lets take this opportunity to forcibly mention all adverse action that YouTube and other big tech firms take against us. Be on the lookout for Black content creators to create a new trending hashtag to identify the efforts against us.

2021 is a pivotal year for Black people.


We must concern ourselves with aggregating resources and aiming them at our opponents, because we can see that they’re aiming theirs at us.

Barrington Williams, B1Daily

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